Then what should I fear?

Jalāl ad-Dīn Muhammad Rūmī, also known as Jalāl ad-Dīn Muhammad Balkhī, Mevlânâ/Mawlānā (“our master”), Mevlevî/Mawlawī (“my master”), and more popularly simply as Rumi (30 September 1207 – 17 December 1273), was a 13th-century persian poet, islamic scholar and a sufi mystic.

The general theme of Rumi’s thought, like that of other mystic and sufi poets of persian literature, is that of tawhid — union with the Beloved, from whom he sees himself as being cut off.  His longing and desire to attain it is evident in the following poem from his book the Masnavi;

I died to the mineral state and became a plant,
I died to the vegetable state and reached animality,
I died to the animal state and became a man,
Then what should I fear? I have never become less from dying.
At the next charge (forward) I will die to human nature,
So that I may lift up (my) head and wings (and soar) among the angels,
And I must (also) jump from the river of (the state of) the angel,
Everything perishes except His Face,
Once again I will become sacrificed from (the state of) the angel,
I will become that which cannot come into the imagination,
Then I will become non-existent; non-existence says to me (in tones) like an organ,
Truly, to Him is our return.

Source:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rumi

http://www.bbc.com/culture/story/20140414-americas-best-selling-poet

 

 


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