A society in crisis

People, mostly the young, students, are protesting on a daily basis in Venezuela. Anti-government demonstrations that started peacefully have become increasingly violent as protesters are met by the military and police forces equipped with water canons, tear gas and fire guns. And what are the young protesters demonstrating for? Food, medicine, a safe society and fresh elections.

Basic human rights in essence.

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And it is an unequal fight for sure, but that does not stop the people from standing up for their rights.

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https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/apr/24/venezuela-protests-roads-blocked-nicolas-maduro

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/may/25/venezuela-protests-riots-frontline-caracas-nicolas-maduro#img-4

Freedom of speech

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When the power of the internet first became apparent, the obvious resort of government was simply to ban or block access to sources of information that political leadership found displeasing.

The Snowden revelations led to a healthy debate on how a democratic country, the United States, as well as some of its allies, carries out massive online surveillance. But repressive regimes have seized upon this to introduce more online repression that increasingly leads to detentions. In Bahrain, malicious links have been used to identify and arrest several anonymous Twitter users who were outspoken against the government. Kazakhstan adopted legislation similar to Russia’s in order to crack down on digital media carrying criticism of the authorities. In Bangladesh and in Singapore, government reprisals have focused on social media posts critical of political leaders. Iranian authorities have continued to hand down harsh punishments, sentencing some users to lengthy prison terms for their digital activities. The Syrian regime, in the midst of a civil war, had an army of hackers that infected 10,000 computers with malware.

The freedom of speech is not only threatened in suppressing regimes but as well on the internet.

Source: https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2014/dec/11/guardian-view-freedom-internet-under-attack-around-world

Women’s rights

India, the world’s largest democracy, has a strong civil society, vigorous media, and an independent judiciary, but also serious human rights concerns.

Among these, is the violence against women, particularly rape and murder. While legal reforms introduced in response to the 2012 Delhi gang rape and murder gave prosecutors new tools for pursuing such crimes, they also expanded use of the death penalty. The Indian government does not appear to have a mechanism in place to track the efficacy of the reforms in preventing and punishing sexual violence. It has also failed to take effective measures to reduce sexual harassment and improve women’s access to safe transportation.

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Source: human rights watch

 

 

Democracy of pro-globalisation

Political newcomer Emmanuel Macron will be France’s next president, pollsters projected Sunday night, delivering a victory to a pro-European former investment banker and strengthening France’s place as a central pillar of the European Union. Macron politics advocate more openness, pro-trade, pro-competition, pro-immigration and pro-EU, embracing cultural change and technological disruption.

 

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Patience

Patience is not sitting and waiting, it is foreseeing. It is looking at the thorn and seeing rose, looking at the night and seeing the day. Lovers are patient and know that the moon needs time to become full.

– Shams Tabrizi

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Vibrations..

The purpose of mantras are to create vibrations of inner peace and self-regard and attention towards the heart.

How do these vibration actually in a physical sense have any effect on our cells, organs and inner energy?

Take a look at this interesting video;